Home | Getting Started | Gift Center | Gear Store | Topo Maps | My Wildernet | Newsletter Signup
STATE:
ACTIVITY:
SEARCH:

Mountain Biking: Colorado > Rio Grande National Forest > Divide Ranger District

Quick Facts

Beartown Road

Beginning Elevation: 10,500 Feet (3273.1 Meters) Junction of Beartown Road #506 and Stony Pass Road #520.
Difficulty: Moderate to More Difficult
Ending Elevation: 12,100 Feet (3771.8 Meters) At Kite Lake, just north of Hunchback Mountain.
Length: 5.9 Miles (9.83 Kilometers)
Length, Round Trip: 12 Miles (20.0 Kilometers)
Road Number: 506
Time, Round Trip: 2 1/2 to 3 Hours
Usage: Heavy 500-1500 users per season
USGS Maps: Pole Creek Mtn., Rio Grande Pyramid; Storm King Peak
Vehicle Accessibility: Multiple use




Satellite and Topo Map




General Description

Wildflowers
Copyright: Unknown
Wildflowers
The Beartown Road itself is the only route in the Bear Creek Drainage which is open to motorized vehicles. Most travelers include this scenic, remote and primitive road as a side trip while en route from Creede to Silverton via Stony Pass (Forest Development Road 520) .

The Beartown Road (Forest Road 506) leaves the Stony Pass Road (4-wheel drive) to the south, approximately 8 1/4 miles from Lost Trail Campground. The road then runs in a southwesterly direction for approximately 6 miles to Kite Lake (located just below the Continental Divide and Hunchback Mountain and Pass), where it dead-ends.

The route generally traverses a southeast exposure throughout its length and has a well-defined double tread. With the exception of the last mile, the route is not steep, but contains many rocks embedded in its tread, which makes much of the route slow-going.

The road runs mostly through an open valley in which Bear Creek is located. It then climbs steeply over the last mile through high alpine country to Kite Lake (12,100 feet elevation). At its junction with the Stony Pass Road, the Beartown Road drops 100 feet in 1/4 mile to the Rio Grande River, where it crosses the river and begins paralleling Bear Creek up the valley. This crossing generally poses no real problems except in early to mid-June, if spring run-off is high. Over the next 3 plus miles the road gradually climbs 400 feet in elevation. The road then climbs another 300 feet in the next 1/2 mile, to the lower end of the meadow in which the Beartown site is located.

Beartown is located in the upper end of this meadow. Evidence of the old mining town is nearly gone, with only telltale signs of where old cabins once stood. The structures that once stood near the old mine location are now collapsed and rapidly disappearing.

Just beyond the Beartown site, at the upper end of the meadow, the road begins to climb steeply (almost 900 feet in just over one mile) to Kite Lake. The road dead-ends at Kite Lake near an old mining shack that is till standing. Kite Lake sits in a partial bowl formed by the backbone of the Continental Divide with Hunchback Mountain and Pass just to the south. The lake is sterile, supporting no fish or other life forms.

Early to midsummer usually brings a profusion of wildflowers and breathtaking color to the mountainsides adjacent to the road, especially around and just beyond the old Beartown site. Columbines and multitudes of other species of wildflowers add color and beauty to the landscape.

Directions from Creede: Drive a little over 20 miles southwest on Highway 149 to the intersection of Highway 149 and Rio Grande Reservoir Road (Forest Development Road 520). Bear left at the junction and continue just over 18 miles west to Lost Trail Campground. Just beyond Lost Trail Campground, the road becomes Stony Pass Road (Forest Road 520). Continue west on this 4-wheel drive road for approximately 8 1/4 miles to Beartown Road (Forest Road 506). Turn left on the Beartown Road which runs south-southwest.

Seasonal Information:
Normally Accessible: Late June through Mid-October (NOTE: Contact the Creede office to see if road is open.) .



Current Conditions & Trip Reports

Add your own trip Report! Newly re-released feature. One of the most popular features on Wildernet, trip reports allow you to share your experiences with others. This is an invaluable resource for determining what to expect on your outdoor adventure, so please participate! To prevent spamming, you must be a registered user of Wildernet in order to submit a trip report

No trip reports filed to date. Please be the first one to do so!



Recreation Opportunities
Activity Remarks On Site
ICON Four-Wheel Driving Beartown Road
Yes
ICON Horseback Riding With the exception of the last mile, the route is not steep.
Yes
ICON Mountain Biking Many rocks embedded in the road.
Yes
ICON ATV Riding Many rocks embedded in the tread
Yes
ICON Motorcycle Riding Dirt Bikes
Yes



Related Activities
Lost Trail Campground - The campground is located 38.2 miles southwest of Creede on Forest Road 520. There are numerous attractions to tempt the camper.

Stony Pass Road 520 - This is a scenic and remote primitive road that is a popular route between the historic mining towns of Creede and Silverton. Numerous mining claims, mines, and associated structures are found along the route.



More Information

Visitor Information:

Creede-Mineral County Chamber of Commerce, P.O. Box 580 , Creede, CO, 81130, Phone: 800-327-2102 or 719-658-2374, Fax: 719-658-2717

Advertisement





About Wildernet |  Email to a Friend  |  Disclaimer |  Privacy |  Contact Us  | Comments & Suggestions
Advertisers & Sponsors |  Owners & Operators |  Tourism Promotors
©1995-2017 Interactive Outdoors Inc. All rights reserved.