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Maine National Wildlife Refuges



Carlton Pond WPA- Established November 24, 1965, Carlton Pond WPA is the only Waterfowl Production Area in Region 5. Purchased with funds from the sale of duck stamps, the area is open for hunting, trapping, fishing and other public uses.
Cross Island National Wildlife Refuge- Cross Island NWR is an island complex donated to the FWS by Thomas and Virginia Cabot. Located in Cutler, the complex includes Cross Island , Scotch Island, Outer Double Head Shot, Inner Double Head Shot, Mink and Old Man Island.
Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge- The refuge is located in eastern Maine's Washington County consisting of two unites. The 17,257 acre Baring Unit off U.S. Route 1 SW of Calais and the 7,189 acre Edmunds Unit near Dennysville.
Petit Manan National Wildlife Refuge- Petit Manan NWR is a coastal refuge covers 130 miles of coastline offshore islands characterized by red and white spruce, jack pine stands, coastal raised heaths, blueberry barrens, marshes, cedar swamps, granite shores and cobble beaches.
Pond Island National Wildlife Refuge- Pond Island NWR is an island of mixed grasses and shrubs which host a variety of nesting seabirds including eider ducks and herring and black-backed gulls. It also provides habitat for migrating waterfowl and shorebirds.
Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge- The refuge is surrounded by the highly developed towns of the Southern Maine Coast, however, 250 species of birds and other wildlife have been recorded. Public access to the refuge is restricted.
Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge- Sunkhaze Meadows NWR encompasses the second largest peat bog in Maine. Peat deposits, up to 18 feet thick in places, were at one time threatened by development.

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General Information

The Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge
Copyright: Patty Elton - Interactive Outdoors, Inc.
The Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge
Description - Maine's National Wildlife Refuges are protected and preserved areas with the intent of maintaining an environment for nesting seabirds and migratory birds while offering a home to numerous species of mammals, reptiles, amphibians and plant life. Most of Maine's NWRs may be found along the coastal regions and islands. Several are located inland with varying forest and soil communities including a peat bog.

Attractions - Maine's National Wildlife Refuges are protected and preserved areas with the intent of maintaining an environment for nesting seabirds and migratory birds while offering a home to numerous species of mammals, reptiles, amphibians and plant life. Most of Maine's NWRs may be found along the coastal regions and islands. Several are located inland with varying forest and soil communities including a peat bog.

Recreation - Maine's National Wildlife Refuges offer nature photography, wildlife viewing and viewing migratory birds. Several of the refuges are used for organized environmental education.

Climate - The climate in this northern state is cool year round. Summer high temperatures average near 75 degrees F, but often reach 90 degrees in the southern portion of the state. Summer evenings are cool and a sweater is usually necessary. Fall is usually dry with crisp days and cool nights. Expect nighttime temperatures to reach into the high 30s, especially in the northern regions of the state. This weather brings spectacular foliage colors between early September and late October. Winter can be long and gray in Maine, but recreation opportunities abound to beat the cold. Average daytime temperatures from December through March remain close to 20 degrees F. Nighttime temperatures can dip below zero. Spring is usually wet with snowmelt and rains. Moderate temperatures between 45 and 60 degrees F can be expected during the day.

Location - Most of Maine's NWRs may be found along the coastal regions and islands. Several are located inland with varying forest and soil communities including a peat bog.


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Additional Information:
Maine - The beautiful state of Maine is mostly rural and encompasses a great variety of landscapes. There are over 5,000 miles of gorgeous surf-crashing coastline, majestic mountains, cold rushing streams and rivers, crushed seashell beaches and picturesque island-dotted glistening lakes.

Links:
Maine US Fish & Wildlife Service Offices - Official web site

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