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Oregon National Wildlife Refuges



Ankeny National Wildlife Refuge- Ankeny NWR, located in the Willamette Valley, was created to provide vital wintering habitat for dusky Canada geese. The refuge is open to limited opportunities for wildlife-oriented education and recreation.
Bandon Marsh National Wildlife Refuge- Bandon Marsh NWR is located along the picturesque southern Oregon coast near the mouth of the Coquille River, and the city of Bandon. This refuge protects the largest remaining tract of salt marsh within the Coquille River estuary.
Baskett Slough National Wildlife Refuge- The 2,492 acre Baskett Slough National Wildlife Refuge was created to provide vital wintering habitat for dusky Canada geese. Unlike most other Canada geese, duskies have limited summer and winter ranges. They nest on Alaska's Copper River Delta and winter almost exclusively in the Willamette Valley.
Cape Meares National Wildlife Refuge- Cape Meares NWR is located on a small headland just south of Tillamook Bay on the northern Oregon coast. It is adjacent to the Pacific Ocean and Cape Meares Lighthouse State Park.
Cold Springs National Wildlife Refuge- Cold Springs NWR lies in sharp contrast with the arid desert surroundings of northeastern Oregon. The refuge, a tree-lined reservoir, lies 7 miles east of the agricultural community of Hermiston. The variety of refuge habitats attract an abundance of wildlife.
Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge- The Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge was established as a range and breeding ground for pronghorn antelope and other species of wildlife. Located in the northern Great Basin, the refuge is a volcanic fault block, which reaches 8065 feet elevation at Warner Peak.
Klamath Forest National Wildlife Refuge- Klamath Marsh is a large natural marsh, with a backdrop of the Cascade Mountain Range in central Oregon, encompasses the upper reaches of the Williamson River and provides important nesting, feeding, and staging habitat for waterfowl and sandhill crane.
Malheur National Wildlife Refuge- Malheur NWR is a large refuge in Harney County in eastern Oregon. It is an important nesting area for greater sandhill cranes, colonial waterbirds such as white faced ibis and eared grebes, various waterfowl species, bobolinks, and shorebirds.
McKay Creek National Wildlife Refuge- Nestled between the plains and the Blue Mountains of eastern Oregon, McKay Creek National Wildlife Refuge offers habitat for rare and endangered species and is a haven for breeding and migratory birds.
Oregon Islands National Wildlife Refuge- Oregon Islands NWR includes over 1,400 coastal islands, rocks, and reefs scattered along the 360 miles of Oregon coast, from Tillamook Head near Seaside south to the California border.
Umatilla National Wildlife Refuge- Umatilla National Wildlife Refuge is located in northern Oregon on the the Columbia River on the Washington border.
William L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge- William L. Finley NWR was created to provide vital wintering habitat for dusky Canada geese. Located in the Willamette Valley, William L. Finley NWR protects many of the valley's historic habitats, including the largest remaining tract of native Willamette Valley wet prairie.

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General Information

Description - Most of the refuges were created and are managed to protect critical wildlife habitat. Some provide ample public access, while others are very restrictive. The refuges in Oregon range from islands off the Pacific coast to vast high desert tracts in eastern Oregon.

Attractions - Wildlife and scenery are the primary attractions at the Wildlife Refuges. Caple Meares National Wildlife Refuge protects one of the few remaining stands of coastal old growth forest in Oregon. The refuge forest provides habitat to a diversity of wildlife, including threatened species such as northern spotted owls, bald eagles, and marbled murrelets. Marine mammals, including California and Steller sea lions, harbor seals and gray whales can often be seen from this overlook during the proper time of year. The Hart Mountain National Antelope Refuge was established as a range and breeding ground for pronghorn antelope and other species of wildlife. Located in the northern Great Basin, the refuge is a volcanic fault block, which reaches 8,065 feet elevation at Warner Peak. Umatilla NWR is an important migration and wintering area for waterfowl and other birds in the Columbia River Basin, with up to 150,000 ducks and 30,000 Canada geese resting and feeding on its land and water resources. Malheur NWR is a large refuge in Harney County in eastern Oregon. It is an important nesting area for greater sandhill cranes, colonial waterbirds such as white faced ibis and eared grebes, various waterfowl species, bobolinks, and shorebirds. These examples give an idea of the varied nature and attractions of the National Wildlife Refuges in Oregon.

Recreation - Most of the recreation opportunities in the National Wildlife Refuges are wildlife based, however, some visitors go just to enjoy the natural environments, scenery and peace and quiet. Bird-watching is possibly the most popular activity in the refuges. Some of the refuges in eastern Oregon are renowned for their bird-watching opportunities. Other activities enjoyed at some of the refuges include interpretive programs, hiking, hunting and fishing.

Climate - The climate in Oregon varies by region. The coastal region and west of the Cascades is generally temperate and wet. Temperatures rarely rise above 85 degrees F during the warmest months and rarely dip below freezing during the winter. Along the coast expect rain and wind during the fall, winter and spring months.

The mountains receive heavy precipitation and cool temperatures throughout the year. Conditions become more extreme the higher you climb. If visiting the region during the summer months be prepared for afternoon thunderstorms and chilly evening temperatures. Snow may be encountered on high country trails throughout the summer months.

Eastern Oregon is a high desert. Precipitation received annually accumulates to less than 10 inches of rain. Summer temperatures often reach 90 degrees in the lower elevations. Winters can be bitterly cold here, although there is little humidity.

Location - Oregon's National Wildlife Refuges are located throughout the state.


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More Information

Contact Information:
USFWS, Office of the Regional Director, Eastside Federal Complex, 911 NE 11th Ave. , Portland, OR, 97232-4181, Phone: 503-231-6118, Fax: 503-872-2716

Additional Information:
Oregon - Oregon appeals to every outdoor enthusiast, with its temperate climate and coastal, desert and mountainous terrain. Half the acreage within the state is administered for public use by the Federal Government.

Links:
U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Official agency website.

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