Home | Getting Started | Gift Center | Gear Store | Topo Maps | My Wildernet | Newsletter Signup
STATE:
ACTIVITY:
SEARCH:
Vermont > Appalachian Trail - Vermont
Destination Locator: (82 options)

Appalachian Trail - Vermont



Camel's Hump State Forest- Offering over 2,300 acres of land, Camel's Hump State Forest is well-known for its distinctive rocky summits. Fragile area alpine vegetation became protected by the Forest Reserve back in 1969.
Central Vermont- Central Vermont is characterized by beautiful rolling green mountains, crystal clear lakes and rushing streams. Historical sites, museums, ski resorts, challenging multi-use trails, golf courses and more may be found in this picturesque New England region.
Gifford Woods State Park- Gifford Woods State Park was established in 1931. In 1933 and 1934, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) built the picnic area and ranger's quarters. In 1939, the CCC constructed a camping area. During 1959-60, a new camping area was built by the Forests and Parks Department.
Hapgood State Forest- Hapgood State Forest encompasses 118 acres of land in Green Mountain National Forest. The state parcel is leased to a private ski resort. Thirty-five trails of varying difficulty are offered. The Forest does offer access to the Appalachian Trail.
Southern Vermont- Southern Vermont is also known as the Places in History Travel Region due to the historical significance prior to the Revolutionary War and beyond. The 20th century presented the famed artist Norman Rockwell and the city of Brattleboro boasts as the location where Rudyard Kipling produced his finest writings. Beautiful roadways lend themselves to the discovery of nearly a dozen covered bridges, many of which reside on the National Register of Historic Places.

Search by Name within Vermont:



Activity Locator: (478 recreation options)

Activities within Appalachian Trail - Vermont:

All Appalachian Trail - Vermont Outdoor Recreation Activities

Appalachian Trail - Vermont Customized Topo Maps and Aerial Photos
Outdoor Gear and Clothing

Search by Name within Vermont:



Trip Planner

Hotels Airline Tickets Car Rentals
B&Bs Yellow Pages City Guide


General Information

Description - The Appalachian Trail is a footpath of more than 2,150 miles with approximately 146 miles lying in Vermont between the Massachusetts state line near Stamford, Vermont over to the Connecticut River near Hanover, New Hampshire. The trail traverses Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Massachusetts, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Maryland, West Virginia, Virginia, Tennessee, North Carolina and Georgia. Primary use is by weekend or short-term hikers. "Thru-hikers" generally start from the South in early spring and hike the entire length in 5 to 6 months. Some hikers will even begin in Georgia in early spring and hike to Harper's Ferry in West Virginia then drive to Baxter State Park in Maine and reverse the hike in an attempt to avoid inclement weather later in the season.

Attractions - The Appalachian Trail leaves the state of Massachusetts from the Clarksburg State Forest and enters Vermont in the Stamford Meadows Wildlife Management Area. The trail overlaps with the Long Trail which is a 270-mile north-south trail along the main ridge of the Green Mountains. Several hills are negotiated along with several brooks before reaching the first major road in Vermont. SR 9 passes through the lovely Woodford area of the Green Mountain National Forest. One of the first significant climbs in Vermont is Maple Hill, elevation 2,690 feet. The trail descends to Hells Hollow Brook, crossing it and traveling about 6-8 miles due north to reach the next peak, Glastenbury Mountain, elevation 3,748 feet. The trail spends the next 10 miles or so weaving its way along 3,000 foot elevations up to the Grout Pond area, passing the Daniel Webster Memorial State Historic Site. It then weaves along the ridges of Stratton Mountain in a northeasterly direction making a sharp westward turn to reach Stratton Pond. Soon after, Winhall River must be crossed. The trail continues westbound to Prospect Rock, elevation 2,079 feet. From Prospect Rock, the trail turns northbound again and within several miles climbs Spruce Peak, elevation 2,060 feet. A few miles west of this area is the Manchester Ranger District which may be found along SRs 11/30. As the trail heads north it crosses SRs 11/30 into the Bromley Ski Area of Hapgood State Forest. Bromley Mountain is a significant peak in the Peru region standing at 3,260 feet. The trail continues its northern trek into Mad Tom Notch, Styles Peak, elevation 3,394 and into Peru Wilderness Area ascending Peru Peak, elevation 3,429 feet. The trail turns west and crosses a long slender body of water called Long Hole, skirting Griffith Lake, then turning north once again into the High Branch Wilderness Area. Big Peak is negotiated at an elevation of 2,840 feet then onto the ridges of South Buckball Peak and Buckball Peak. A series of creeks, one right after the other, must be crossed in the White Rocks Recreation Area. Shortly, it reaches the western slopes of Homer Stone Mountain. The trail weaves east and once it crosses SR 140, the trail returns to private land. About a mile up the trail it reenters a leg of the National Forest between Bear Hill and Button Hill passing Spring Lake to the east then once again exiting the National Forest. As the trail heads north toward Shrewsbury it crosses SR 103 where Clarendon Gorge may be viewed. The gorge offers views of sheer rock cliffs rising over 100 feet where a foot bridge provides wonderful views of the surrounding area and Mill River. After the trail crosses SR 103 it heads east about 2 miles over to Cold River. Traveling northbound again, it parallels Sargent Brook before reaching Shrewsbury Peak Natural Area, the Mendon Peak Natural Area and up into the very popular Killington ski area. Several peaks must be negotiated in this region including Killington Peak which stands at 4,235 feet, Snowden Peak at 3,592 feet and Rams Heads at 3,600 feet. The trail skirts the ridges of Pico Peak, 3,957 feet before reaching the Pico Alpine ski area and the Gifford Woods area. Just north of US 4, the Long Trail continues northbound through the Green Mountain National Forest to the Canadian border and the Appalachian Trail bears east toward the Connecticut River Valley. After passing the National Natural Landmark of the Gifford Woods Natural Area which features an impressive stand of old hardwood and hemlock, some in excess of 400 years old, the trail passes the southern shore of Kent Pond. Kent Pond is known for large and smallmouth bass as well as brook and rainbow trout. The trail follows an easterly route as it serpentines over to Ottauquechee River. Passing between Rounds Pinnacle and Taylors Pinnacle the trail enters the Les Newell Wildlife Management Area at the confluence of Mink, Stony and Basin Brooks. A mile or so east, the trail leaves the public land and turns south to Pinnacle Mountain, elevation 2,558 feet. From Pinnacle, the trail turns back east to travel several miles to Dana Hill Field which is a well-known wildlife viewing area for raptors, perching birds and upland birds. After crossing SR 12, the trail weaves north to reach Dana Hill at an elevation of 1,530 feet. This popular downhill ski area is laden with successive rolling mountains averaging under 2,000 feet. The trail traverses these lower mountains over the next 8 - 10 miles to reach the West Hardford / White River area which is located along SR 14. From SR 14, the trail turns northbound for less than a mile before bearing eastbound over to Griggs Mountain, Moseley Hill then the town of Norwich. Norwich is located along Interstate 91 running parallel with the Connecticut River and the New Hampshire state line. From this point, the A.T. crosses the river to enter the city of Hanover.

Recreation - Day and overnight hikes are enjoyed along Vermont's portion of the A.T. comprised of soft and rolling mountains with peak elevations averaging 3,000 feet. Thru-hikers can enjoy the fact that once they have completed Vermont, 80% of their trek is finished. Trail amenities include: trout fishing, bass fishing, camping, picnicking, bird watching, viewing scenery and visiting natural areas.

Climate - Vermont's climate varies somewhat depending on region. Generally, the state experiences mild summers with temperatures rarely reaching 90 degrees F. Often summer lows will dip to 50 degrees and by late August temperatures begin to cool. The mountainous regions of the state have seen snow fall in every month, so be prepared for cooler temperatures.

Winters can be harsh and long in this northern state. Snow is likely to fall anytime between September and April. Humidity makes winter weather seem bitter and usually a few weeks during the winter see night time temperature below zero. The average winter temperature is 20 degrees F with highs reaching into the forties on warm days.

Location - The Appalachian Trail segment in Vermont begins along the state line of Massachusetts near Stamford and heads in a northern direction through the middle of Green Mountain National Forest where it exits the Forest near Shrewsbury and heads northeast into Coolidge State Forest. It reenters Green Mountain National Forest near Gifford Woods where it splits off from the Long Trail which continues north while the A.T. heads due east over into New Hampshire.


Current Conditions & Trip Reports

Trip Reports:
Add your own trip Report! Newly re-released feature. One of the most popular features on Wildernet, trip reports allow you to share your experiences with others. This is an invaluable resource for determining what to expect on your outdoor adventure, so please participate! To prevent spamming, you must be a registered user of Wildernet in order to submit a trip report

No trip reports filed to date. Please be the first one to do so!


More Information

Contact Information:
The Appalachian Trail Conference, P.O. Box 807, Washington & Jackson Streets , Harpers Ferry, WV, 25425-0807, Phone: 304-535-6331

Additional Information:
Camel's Hump State Forest - Offering over 2,300 acres of land, Camel's Hump State Forest is well-known for its distinctive rocky summits. Fragile area alpine vegetation became protected by the Forest Reserve back in 1969.
Central Vermont - Central Vermont is characterized by beautiful rolling green mountains, crystal clear lakes and rushing streams. Historical sites, museums, ski resorts, challenging multi-use trails, golf courses and more may be found in this picturesque New England region.
Gifford Woods State Park - Gifford Woods State Park was established in 1931. In 1933 and 1934, the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) built the picnic area and ranger's quarters. In 1939, the CCC constructed a camping area. During 1959-60, a new camping area was built by the Forests and Parks Department.
Hapgood State Forest - Hapgood State Forest encompasses 118 acres of land in Green Mountain National Forest. The state parcel is leased to a private ski resort. Thirty-five trails of varying difficulty are offered. The Forest does offer access to the Appalachian Trail.
Southern Vermont - Southern Vermont is also known as the Places in History Travel Region due to the historical significance prior to the Revolutionary War and beyond. The 20th century presented the famed artist Norman Rockwell and the city of Brattleboro boasts as the location where Rudyard Kipling produced his finest writings. Beautiful roadways lend themselves to the discovery of nearly a dozen covered bridges, many of which reside on the National Register of Historic Places.
Vermont - This state has a diverse geography that will satisfy every outdoor enthusiast in all seasons. The Green Mountains and Lake Champlain are two of the most obvious geographic features that support outdoor activities.
Vermont National Forests and Parks - Vermont is nicknamed the Green Mountain State due to the fabulous 350,000 acres and over 500 miles of trails the Green Mountain National Forest offers its residents and visitors. The National Park Services manages the historic Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller property in Woodstock, Vermont.

Links:
Appalachian Trail Association - Local non-profit information.

Advertisement





About Wildernet |  Email to a Friend  |  Disclaimer |  Privacy |  Contact Us  | Comments & Suggestions
Advertisers & Sponsors |  Owners & Operators |  Tourism Promotors
©1995-2017 Interactive Outdoors Inc. All rights reserved.